Radioactive dating activity high school

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This group is dedicated to providing information about the scientific method as it concerns the idea of evolution in the Creation/Evolution debate.

The site provides background information about stratigraphic principles and relative time, biostratigraphy (using fossils for relative dating), and radiometric dating.

The site also provides fact sheets on the age of the Earth and isochron dating.

This lesson introduces absolute dating and a few ways in which scientists accomplish it.

The majority of the lesson focuses on radiometric dating, including an activity where students date their own "rocks and fossils".

Basic understanding of how radiometric dating works is useful.

This 5-12-grade activity introduces students to the idea of sequencing information in overlapping data sets and the Principle of Superposition, which is a core concept in relative dating. Offers history of age dating, stratigraphic principles, rock correlation, fossil correlations, radiometric dating, and the geologic time scale. Short discussion of radioactive dating and stratigraphic principles.

Radiometric Dating and the Geologic Time Scale, The Talk Origins Archive. Provides brief overview of (1) relative dating and stratigraphic methods, (2) absolute dating and radiometric dating, including a table with parent to daughter isotopes and half lives of those isotopes commonly used in radiometric dating, (3) paleomagnetics and (4) geologic time. Includes tables of common radioactive parent isotopes and their stable daughter products, and half lives of common radioactive isotopes.

Learn about different types of radiometric dating, such as carbon dating.

This Buzzle article has a list of radioactive elements that abound in nature, arranged in the order of increasing atomic number, along with their decay modes. Radioactivity arrived on the scene of world physics in the 19th century, just when people thought they knew everything in physics.

With its discovery in 1896, radioactivity opened up a Pandora's box of questions and revealed a new world, waiting to be explored in the microcosm of the atomic nucleus. Radioactivity is a very interesting phenomenon in nature.

It is a great introduction to the scientific process of deducing, forming scientific theories, and communicating with peers.

It is also useful in the mathematics classroom by the process of graphing the data.

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