Dating a non college graduate

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Read More: Extreme Marriage Experiment Suggests It’s Better to Be Right Than Happy While most married couples still have similar education levels, that percentage too is dropping. "The marriage rate among this group plummeted—from 72% in 1960 to 46% in 2012." Three quarters of American wives in 1960 were married to guys who, like them, had a high school education or less.

Sometime during the 80s, the share of married folks who both didn't go to college slipped below 50%.

The main idea is that women have been attending college at much higher rates than men since the 1980s, in the U. The dating pool for college-educated people in their 30s now has five women for every four men.

For people in their 20s, it's four women for every three men. In Manhattan, there are 38 percent more female college grads under the age of 25 than college-grad men, according to Birger's data. C., 86 percent in Miami, 49 percent in Washington and 37 percent in Los Angeles. that more men than women graduated from college was 1981.

Given the shortage of young men in post-World War I Europe — 10 million soldiers died and 20 million were wounded, many grievously — Bernard wonders why any bachelor would want to settle down. Today’s hookup culture does have one big thing in common with the ’20s flapper generation, and that is demographics.

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The result is that there are only 85 men for every 100 women who are 25 to 35 years old and who are college educated. The report may back up what single women with college degrees have been sensing for years: The pickings are slim.

That's the prime marrying age for Americans, given that men and women tend to be in their late 20s when they marry for the first time, according to the U. The changing demographics will have a wide-ranging impact on men and women, as well as on how they form -- or don't form -- families.

Given the shortage of college-educated men, highly educated women are likely to either look for men who have fewer qualifications (and likely earn less) than them, or else skip marriage entirely, the researchers said."Women are now more educated than men, meaning that they will necessarily face a shortage of marriage partners with the same level of education," Sawhill and Venator wrote.

In the Vanity Fair article, David Buss, a University of Texas psychology professor, says that apps like Tinder contribute to “a perceived surplus of women,” among straight men, which in turn leads to more hookups and fewer traditional relationships.

Here’s the thing: This surplus of women is not just “perceived” but very, very real.

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